Each year the Horizon Advisory Board researches, identifies and ranks key trends affecting the practice of teaching, learning, research, and creative expression. The Board reviews current articles, interviews, papers, and new research to discover emerging or continuing trends. The trends are ranked according to how significant an impact they are likely to have on education in the next five years. The top trends highlighted for 2009 are presented below in priority order, as ranked by the Advisory Board.


4

  • Increasing globalization continues to affect the way we work, collaborate, and communicate. Information technologies are having a significant impact on how people work, play, gain information, and collaborate. Increasingly, those who use technology in ways that expand their global connections are more likely to advance, while those who do not will find themselves on the sidelines. With the growing availability of tools to connect learners and scholars all over the world — online collaborative workspaces, social networking tools, mobiles, voice-over-IP, and more — teaching and scholarship are transcending traditional borders more and more all the time.
  • The notion of collective intelligence is redefining how we think about ambiguity and imprecision. Collective intelligence may give rise to multiple answers, all equally correct, to problems. The notions of collective intelligence and mass amateurization are redefining scholarship as we grapple with issues of top-down control and grassroots scholarship. Today’s learners want to be active participants in the learning process – not mere listeners; they have a need to control their environments, and they are used to easy access to the staggering amount of content and knowledge available at their fingertips.
  • Experience with and affinity for games as learning tools is an increasingly universal characteristic among those entering higher education and the workforce. A recent survey by the Pew Internet and American Life Project found that massively multiplayer and other online game experience is extremely common among young people, is rich and varied, and that games offer opportunity for increased social interaction and civic engagement among this group. The success of game-based learning strategies owes to active participation and interaction being at the center of the experience, and signals that current educational methods are not engaging students enough.
  • Visualization tools are making information more meaningful and insights more intuitive. As tools of this nature continue to be developed and used, visual literacy will become an increasingly important skill in decoding, encoding, and determining credibility and authenticity of data. Visual literacy must be formally taught, but it is an evolving field even now.
  • As more than one billion phones are produced each year, mobile phones are benefiting from unprecedented innovation, driven by global competition. New capabilities in terms of hardware and software are turning mobiles into indispensable tools. Third-party applications, now available on several models of mobile devices, expand their utility even further. This trend, observed in the Horizon Report now for some time, will continue to impact the ways we communicate and view computing and networked resources.

Posted by NMC on January 18, 2009
Tags: Chapters

Total comments on this page: 17

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[...] Gosh Horizon Report 2009 – already – wp.nmc.org/horizon2009/chapters/trends/ [...]

January 24, 2009 11:27 pm
Will Richardson on paragraph 2:

I’m wondering what the basis of the idea that those who connect are more likely to advance than those that don’t. Is there research to support that?

January 26, 2009 4:06 am
Will Richardson on paragraph 2:

Wondering about the conclusion that those who can expand connections are more likely to advance. Is there research to back that up?

January 26, 2009 10:14 am
Rick :

I agree with Will Richardson that a statement like that really has to be backed up, preferably within the paragraph in which it is made.

January 16, 2010 8:33 pm

[...] especially in those classrooms in lower socio-economic areas.  It reminds me of the quote from the Horizon Report a few weeks ago that said: Increasingly, those who use technology in ways that expand their global connections are [...]

February 14, 2009 5:19 am

[...] LINK: 2009 Horizon Report » Key Trends. [...]

February 17, 2009 9:53 am
susip on whole page :

I wonder how is MOTHER EARTH to keep up with the spewing of over one billion phones?

Is technology advancing?
What is on the landfill horizon?

February 23, 2009 10:23 pm

[...] in those classrooms in modify socio-economic areas.  It reminds me of the excerpt from the Horizon Report a whatever weeks ago that said: Increasingly, those who ingest profession in structure that modify their orbicular [...]

March 8, 2009 7:32 am

[...] within the next five years. If you have limited time, the sections Technologies to Watch and Key Trends offer plenty to ponder in a very clear and concise presentation. I read these sections first, as I [...]

April 22, 2009 10:30 am

[...] within the next five years. If you have limited time, the sections Technologies to Watch and Key Trends offer plenty to ponder in a very clear and concise presentation. I read these sections first, as I [...]

April 29, 2009 11:03 am
Joanne Healy on whole page :

What’s new on the Horizon for blending social networks and online interactive education?

May 18, 2009 10:12 am
Allen Keene on whole page :

An interesting recent overview or int’l ed. trends on a language school’s blog: http://acebook.wordpress.com/. Talks about technology and versatility as a new paradigm in education.

June 12, 2009 1:46 pm
Todd McClincey on paragraph 2:

I think that this is an assumption of advancement of technology and the use of education. Oral culture was supplanted by the written word. Digital technology is supplanting printed technology. I don’t think there is an assumption that it is better in its raw form, but the application forces people to change.

September 3, 2009 7:56 am

[...] An handful of well-known tools kept people and companies working and learning at similar rates. No longer is this the case. The rapidly growing toolbox has made some knowledge workers much more productive than others–some2 say twenty times more productive. When observing optimum learners, one can see that they have figured out how to manage their own learning environments, using just the right tools when needed. The productivity gap and learning gap keeps widening. Information technologies are having a significant impact on how people work, play, gain information, and collaborate. Increasingly, those who use technology in ways that expand their global connections are more likely to advance, while those who do not will find themselves on the sidelines.  2009 Horizon Report -Key Trends- [...]

January 26, 2010 2:19 pm

[...] An handful of well-known tools kept people and companies working and learning at similar rates. No longer is this the case. The rapidly growing toolbox has made some knowledge workers much more productive than others–some2 say twenty times more productive. When observing optimum learners, one can see that they have figured out how to manage their own learning environments, using just the right tools when needed. The productivity gap and learning gap keeps widening. Information technologies are having a significant impact on how people work, play, gain information, and collaborate. Increasingly, those who use technology in ways that expand their global connections are more likely to advance, while those who do not will find themselves on the sidelines. 2009 Horizon Report -Key Trends- [...]

January 13, 2011 2:09 pm

[...] trends from the 2009 Horizon Report are still in [...]

April 26, 2012 10:52 am
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